JOIN OUR NEWSLETTER
img

Media Guide to Promoting Youth Rights

Media coverage is extremely important for promoting your issue or campaign. Interviews, news articles, and press releases are all crucial components to be aware of within your local chapter. Media coverage is extremely important for promoting your issue or campaign.

  • Media coverage spreads your message. Most people have never heard of youth rights, or are unsure what it means. Part of our work, and the work of our chapters, is to make sure that the public understands the reasons we advocate for young people. Involving the media not only informs your local community about your campaign, but allows your message to reach a wide range of people who may have never heard of youth rights.
  • Media coverage garners support. Making headlines in a positive way will bring members right to your front doorstep. If the media never covered a single story on us, then we would never have the level of support that we do now. Continually making positive headlines and spreading our message means that we have the potential to gain many new supporters. In addition to letting other know about your campaign and youth right in general, media coverage, if maneuvered correctly, can help to paint you in a positive light. Presenting your chapter as a passionate and knowledgeable one will put a human face to your cause. This will encourage people to identify with you and help gain support.
  • Media coverage exhibits authority. Through continuous presence in the media, your chapter can demonstrate authority in the community. Your chapter will begin to be taken seriously in the eyes of not only other news outlets, providing further media coverage, but also in the eyes of supporters and critics across the nation.

Making your story appealing to the media

  • Is it newsworthy? Not everything that your chapter does will be newsworthy. Media outlets will not report on an organizational chapter meeting. Outlets will, however, cover events that you and your chapter create, protests and rallies you organize, and press releases you distribute. At the end of the day, media outlets mainly care about news. Make sure that your chapter participates in newsworthy activities from time to time.
  • If there is conflict, what is the impact it has on society? Stories that deal with a conflict of some sort, and the impact it has on society, are especially intriguing to media outlets. In order to bring about a change on the views of youth, conflicts with other organizations will come up. The impact that is placed on society because of these conflicts are sure to grab the media’s eye. Keep it in the back of your head while dealing with the media the conflict and impact of the story at hand.
  • Is your story keeping up with the time? People do not read CNN or The New York Times for dated news. In order to keep people informed about what is going on around the country and the world, media outlets tend to cover stories that keep with the times. Rarely will a media outlet cover a story that is a month old. Make sure that your chapter stays active and continues to make progress to ensure the attention of media outlets is brought to your doorstep.

Press Releases

A press release is a concise document that can be written by your chapter or group to inform other on news or on a campaign you are working on. Often they are written by public relations professionals, but you can feel comfortable writing them as well. When written and implemented well, press releases can attract a lot of positive media coverage, resulting in free positive advertising for your chapter. Through some simple changes, press releases can be formed into media advisories. These are simply invitations to the media regarding upcoming events you might be holding. Use these suggestions to help you write an effective press release or advisory:

  • Write the release as if you were the reporter. The idea of a press release is too make the job easy for members of the media. Journalists use an “inverted pyramid” style, where the most important information will be featured at the beginning of the release, and the least important information will be featured at the end of the release:
    • Attention-grabbing headline that tells the story (don’t use clickbait)
    • Opening paragraph answering who, what, why, when, where and how. It should contain all of the absolutely necessary information. The audience should be able to get the gist of the release in the first few sentences.
    • Mid-section containing additional information that is helpful, but not necessary. Contains quotes.
    • Final section has the least important information.
    • Keep the press release short and concise. Do not lengthen it by adding unnecessary information and details. Extra information raises more questions than it answers, and runs the risk of losing the interest of reporters. Press releases are usually around 300-400 words. Don’t add filler information.
  • Locate effective quotes and statements from officials within your organization and try to find an emotional angle. This intrigues news outlets and keeps them interested.
  • Include quotes and emotion-invoking statements. This grabs the audience’s attention and keeps them interested. This provides a “Human-interest” angle.
  • Write the press releases in a positive light – regardless of whether or not it being written to defend the company in the midst of crisis or to attract the press.
  • Make sure the press release is thoroughly edited by a set of fresh eyes, just as any piece of writing needs to be.
  • Contact your intended outlets directly, through e-mail or fax. If you or your organization has any personal, direct contacts to any of your intended outlets, contact them directly to ensure the release is read by an actual media contact.
img

OUR BLOG

img

NYRA-Fairfax Secures Voting Age Endorsements

Thanks to the efforts of the newly formed Fairfax County NYRA chapter, the Fairfax County Democratic Party and grassroots organizations Virginia Democracy Forward and Virginia Civic...

BY Brian Conner
img

Bill introduced in U.S. House to lower the voting age to sixteen

Last week, U.S. Representative Grace Meng (D-NY) introduced a resolution proposing an amendment to the U.S. Constitution that would lower the voting age to sixteen throughout...

BY NYRA
img

Over 70 people testify in favor of lowering the voting age in Washington D.C.

On Wednesday, NYRA members attended a public hearing before the Washington, D.C. City Council to support the Youth Vote Amendment Act of 2018. If passed, this...

BY NYRA
img

NYRA-Cumberland County, N.C. kicks off its campaign to lower the voting age

Last week, I met with N.C. State Senator Ben Clark, who I spoke with briefly about lowering the voting age in North Carolina to 16 years...

BY Mahsiah Imes
img

Calling B.S. on Ageism: What the Response to the Parkland Shooting Means for Youth Rights

Yet another reason we should lower the voting age The fallout from the Parkland shooting has brought the country’s attention to several facts that often go...

BY NYRA
img

National Association Calls on DC Council To Make History, Lower Voting Age

WASHINGTON, D.C. April 10, 2018: The National Youth Rights Association applauds Councilmember Charles Allen for introducing the Youth Vote Amendment Act of 2018 today, and calls...

BY NYRA
img

Interview with CA Assemblymember Evan Low

Evan Low is a California Assemblymember representing the 28th District and is no stranger to ageism. When he hit the streets to run for Campbell City...

BY Neil Bhateja
View More
img

Over 70 people testify in favor of lowering the voting age in Washington D.C.

On Wednesday, NYRA members attended a public hearing before the Washington, D.C. City Council to support the Youth Vote Amendment Act of 2018. If passed, this...

BY NYRA
img

Support Prop F! Help Lower the Voting Age in San Francisco!

We have a historic opportunity to lower the voting age in San Francisco, and we NEED YOUR HELP! No matter your age, no matter where you...

BY NYRA
img

NYRA-Cumberland County, N.C. kicks off its campaign to lower the voting age

Last week, I met with N.C. State Senator Ben Clark, who I spoke with briefly about lowering the voting age in North Carolina to 16 years...

BY Mahsiah Imes
img

Drinking Age on the Ballot in Massachusetts

I am a long time NYRA member and thanks to my petitioning efforts, next month in Amherst Massachusetts voters will be able to vote on whether...

BY Matthew Malone
img

Bill introduced in U.S. House to lower the voting age to sixteen

Last week, U.S. Representative Grace Meng (D-NY) introduced a resolution proposing an amendment to the U.S. Constitution that would lower the voting age to sixteen throughout...

BY NYRA
img

YR in action – opposing a curfew

A few weeks ago, I posted a thread on the NYRA forums about a curfew in a village near me for the nights of October 30...

BY Stefan Muller
img

Calling B.S. on Ageism: What the Response to the Parkland Shooting Means for Youth Rights

Yet another reason we should lower the voting age The fallout from the Parkland shooting has brought the country’s attention to several facts that often go...

BY NYRA
img

NYRA Vice President Wins Battle Against Long Island Curfew

NYRA's Vice-President, Stefan Muller has been leading a campaign against a Long Island, New York village's curfew ordinance. With the help of other concerned students and...

BY NYRA
img

MemYU Takes Tennessee by Storm

We at the Memphis Youth Union (MemYU) have decided to develop our local campaign to state. Our goal? Extension of voting rights to sixteen- and seventeen-year-olds...

BY Memphis Youth Union
View More